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Question Of The Week

Replacement Fuel Tanks: Is More Fuel Foolish?

Truck Camper Magazine readers share if they already have or would consider a replacement fuel tanks.  Check out these auxiliary fuel tank solutions.

If you’re considering a replacement tank, we urge you begin by reading, “Matching A Truck and Truck Camper”, and run the recommended weight and payload numbers on your rig.  Added road range is fantastic, but never at the expense of safety.

“I’m not considering it, although I would welcome the convenience of stopping less often.  It’s just pushing the payload too much.  And I could stand the loss of the Bite-Me Burgers.” – John Tully, 2013 Ford F-250 , 2015 Lance 855S

“I have a forty-five gallon Transfer Flow frame mounted gas tank.  It saves me fuel stops, and I can fill up where gas is cheap.  The disadvantage is filling the tank and then seeing gas price ten cents less twenty-five miles down the road.  Gas Buddy is not always accurate.” – Edwin Groenendyk, 2008 Chevy 2500HD, 2014 Sundance 285TS, and a 2010 Palomino pop-up camper

“I’ve often thought about replacement fuel tanks, but never acted on replacing the standard tank.  I thought about it because, like many of us, I love modifications and gadgets.  I passed on it because I’m a cheapskate and slow to act (because I’m a cheapskate?).  

My Ford OEM tank holds about 38 gallons of #2 diesel.  I’m able to travel nearly 400 miles on a load of that oily substance.  I’d happily keep on driving but, really, a stop now and then is probably a good thing.

My gripe is that credit card fill ups often shut off way before the fill up point due to station dollar limits necessitating a second authorization.  Out here on the West Coast, diesel hovers just under $4.00 a gallon.  I can only imagine trying to fill up a mega tank.” – Mark Obert, 1999 Ford F250, 1999 Lance 920

“I already swapped out the tank with a Titan 52 gallon tank.  The only problem is that the credit card turns off pump at their limit.  Then I have to start it again to finish topping up.  It’s priceless to eliminate maneuvering in and out of stations designed for foreign cars.  With a large tank, you can more easily chose your stations.” – Harvey Melcher, 2007 Chevy 2500, 32 foot Bullet premier

“I had an F250 with a 7.3L diesel.  I carried a five gallon spare tank occasionally for trips to Alaska, Canada, Moab, etc.  I only needed it once on the Dalton Highway in Alaska.  But, having it, made me feel more comfortable.

A mechanic told me to never run a diesel dry.  You cannot re-pressurize the high pressure lines easily.

FYI, you can carry a spare diesel on ferries, but not gas or propane.  My 2012 is a gasser and it has a thirty-six gallon tank, which is much better than the 29 gallons in the diesel.  Also, I need a break every 200 to 300 miles.” – Philip Bolding, 2012 Ford F350, 1994 Lance Squire Lite 150

“It would not add that much fuel.  With a short bed, extended cab I do not have very much room.  Also, the price is about $1,200.00 to add about twenty gallons.” – Allan Hann, 2007 Chevrolet Silverado 2500, Lance 861

“I am not planning on changing tank sizes.  The thirty-six gallon tank in my new truck is great.  It gives me the distance that I want, which is about 450 miles per day.  Since I have to stop, it’s not a big deal to get some gas.  But, no Slurpees!” – Mark Turnbull, 2013 Chevy 3500 HD, 2011 Four Wheel Camper Hawk

“The total replacement of the fuel tanks makes it too expensive to retrofit but, if there were smaller add-on tanks for about $300, I would add one right now.” – Everett Baird, 2009 Ford 350, 2010 Lance 950

“This summer we drove to Alaska and back, and never got close to emptying our thirty-four gallon gas tank.  Also, filling is an opportunity to get out and briefly stretch our legs.” – Philip Tron, 2009 Chevy 3500, 2012 Lance 1050

“The last trip with the camper, and towing the boat, we got twelve miles per gallon.  At that rate we get a considerable distance.  I don’t mind stopping because me and the dog need to water the lawn somewhere.  Also, without the camper and boat, the truck got twenty-one miles per gallon going to the Keys house, which is 500 miles and we still had fuel for a week.  By the way, the trip took 8.5 hours even stopping for a break.  I’m satisfied with what my tank holds.” – Gary Raymond, 2014 Ram 3500, 2006 Lance 1191

“My Ford F350 has a flat farm bed on it.  I use it when my camper is detached.  I have mounted a fifteen gallon auxiliary fuel tank on top of my truck bed on the left side directly above my factory fuel tank.  It is out of the way when I load my camper.  The cost was only $175 as compared to the price of an extended capacity fuel tank.  I would easily have room to add an additional fifteen gallon if I chose to.

I find the extra fuel capacity very handy when traveling as I can stock up on less expensive fuel when traveling in those states.  My truck is diesel, so that can amount to a significant savings.  I drive about 50,000 miles per year as I use my truck and camper in my business.” – Tim Cherry, 2006 Ford F350, 2008 Okanagan

“I considered putting a larger fuel tank on, but my truck runs so close to maximum rear axle weight being a single rear wheel that I didn’t feel I could handle the extra weight.  I just use Gas Buddy to plan my stops around cheaper fuel to keep the cost of a fill up down.” – Leonard Pennock, 2006 Dodge 3500, 2003 Eagle Cap 950

“I would not get one.  I have been over most main roads in Canada and the United States and I have never had an issue with getting fuel.  That includes up to Alaska and the Arctic Circle.” – Joe Munn, 2001 Dodge, 1999 Bigfoot 9′ 6″

“After having one too many close calls with low fuel, I installed a Transfer Flow 41 gallon tank.  Having extra fuel allows worry-free travel, plus I can take advantage of good fuel prices.  It was a toss-up between Transfer Flow and Titan, but my mechanic had so many bad experiences with Titan and the heat that he only installs Transfer Flow.  I highly recommend it and have no regrets!” – Richard Petty, 2006 Ford, 2006 Outfitter Apex 8

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