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Bigfoot 25C10.4 Wet Weight and Truck Recommendations

For the Bigfoot 25C10.4 wet weight calculation, we are going to start with the Bigfoot-approved 3,230 pound dry weight from our Bigfoot Camper Buyers Guide.  Then we are going to add the option weight for the options installed on the review unit for a second wet weight calculation.

Base Dry Weight – Factory Order Only

Bigfoot 25C10.4: dry weight, 3,230 pounds + 39 gallons fresh, 325.3 pounds + 6 gallon water heater, 50 pounds + 2x 20-pound full propane tanks, 40 pounds + 2 batteries, 130 pounds + stuff, 500 pounds = 4,275.3 pounds

Base Dry Weight – with options installed on review unit

The camper under review has the following installed options; Dometic 11,000 BTU air conditioner, crank up TV antenna, Fantastic Fan in galley, built-in Onan QG 2500 LP propane generator, optical rear vision door, skylight in shower, and a propane and 110-volt electric water heater.  We also believe the side awning is optional, but we were not able to verify this with Bigfoot’s option list.

In total, we estimate these options add 250 pounds to the dry weight of the camper.  Let’s add this option weight to the dry weight, and re-calculate.

Bigfoot 25C10.4: dry weight, 3,480 pounds + 39 gallons fresh, 325.3 pounds + 6 gallon water heater, 50 pounds + 2x 20-pound full propane tanks, 40 pounds + 2 batteries, 130 pounds + stuff, 500 pounds = 4,525.3 pounds

Truck Recommendations for the Bigfoot 25C10.4

Not too long ago, a 4,525.3 pound wet weight would have limited a camper to a dually truck.  In 2018, there are a few one-ton single rear wheel trucks that can handle that payload, but you won’t find one on a dealer lot.  Such a truck needs to be carefully designed, optioned, and featured – and then special ordered.

For example, a 2018 Ford F350 XLT 4×4 Super Cab Long Bed single rear-wheel can be optioned for 11,500 pounds of GVWR and 4,710 pounds of payload capacity.  That gives you 184.7 pounds of excess payload for the well-optioned and wet Bigfoot 25C10.4 under review.  With the 4,275.3 pound base unit, you would have 434.7 pounds of payload margin.

Taking a step back, the 4.525.3 pound loaded and wet weight of the review unit is pushing the limits of single rear wheel trucks.  Unless you’re willing to special order a truck for this purpose, you will need a dually truck to be within payload capacity.

This is especially true if (a) you want to tow something, or (b) you want a truck with heavy features and options (think diesel engines, upgraded transmissions, and luxury interior packages).  If either or both of these describe you, you need a dually truck for the Bigfoot 25C10.4.  We have a dually for our long bed, non-slide truck camper and love the combination and its margin of safety.

Of course we have a must-read in-depth article on the subject titled, How To Match A Truck and Truck Camper.  To avoid the many potential pitfalls of truck and camper matching, please read this article first.

VERDICT – Bigfoot 10.4 Pros and Cons

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